In preparation, why don’t you go ahead and download this worksheet

And check out these Small Business Boosters that we will be talking about in more detail. 

Dee:

I am joined by Jane Harrell of ‘Cause Digital Marketing to discuss what social media platforms you should be on and what you should be doing on them.

We’re so lucky to have Jane with us. She’s my social media guru, and she can be yours too. She has over 17 years experience in the field. She works in the pet industry a lot, and she works with social causes, so she’s a really good egg and a wonderful human, as well as being the boss at all this content stuff. She’s worked with Animal Planet, Victoria Stillwell, and she’s even been featured in Time Magazine.

So Time Magazine, that’s quite an achievement.

Jane:

Oh, thank you. Thank you. That was one of my very first kind of big wins in my career. And I personally project managed and led the creation of the very first iPhone app for Petfinder.com back in 2010. It was scary as all get out because I was still pretty junior in my career at that time. And it ended up becoming one of the top 10 apps of 2010 according to Time Magazine, which was just amazing. And to clarify, it wasn’t me that was featured, it was the app that was featured.

Dee:

That’s amazing. And tell us about some of your other recent projects.

Jane:

Oh my goodness. So, last year we had the honour of being interviewed by inc.com, that was all about the top mistakes that we see brands make on social media.

And we have had the honor of working with some just amazing brands since I jumped off the corporate ladder and started because digital marketing, including Animal Planet, Victoria Stilwell, and I have written a bunch for a number of different pet industry related publications like Pets Plus Magazine, American Animal Hospital Associations, Trends Magazine, and some others all talking about how to better promote, and better market your business, and better position your business strategically.

Dee:

And one thing that you and I were involved with together was a planning retreat in January this year, where you really help the attendees schedule out what they should be doing on social media for the upcoming year. That was really fascinating listening to, talking about timed content and so forth. 

Jane:

Thank you. A lot of that comes from being editor-in-chief of websites like Petfinder.com which at the time was the world’s second or first largest pet website, with millions and millions of views every single month. I’ve also been editor-in-chief of a startup called Pet Health Network and that editorial background has helped me immensely in helping other people. 

Dee: 

Social media is definitely a topic that gets a lot of people confused, especially when they’re starting out their business and they’re feeling overwhelmed about all the other stuff they have to do. There’s so many different social media platforms. People get confused about whether they should register for all of them. Maybe they do, and then they end up doing nothing on any of them. So what would you advise people who are starting out?

Jane:

Yeah, I love this question. So, I’ve been teaching social media for a long time now and running social media for a number of different brands. And there’s a personal mantra that I developed to help keep myself sane. But when I’m teaching social media, this is usually where I start because people go in and they feel like, ‘Oh my God, there’s so many different channels, so many different places that you can be active as your brand to get the word out there.’ And the biggest struggle that we see is that people try to be everywhere. So when I’m teaching this, I always have people repeat my mantra and kind of get it into their head to start. 

I don’t need to be everywhere. 

I don’t need to do everything. 

I don’t need to be everything to everyone.

Everything works better when I’m not.

And that’s it. When you’re thinking about content marketing, when you’re thinking about social media marketing or even digital marketing in general, getting to the core of understanding which channels you’re gonna select. Really getting clear on just a couple, just trying a few out, getting very clear on why you’re there and what you are doing there and what you expect that ROI to be. 

And making sure that it’s tailored to the channel so that you’re most likely to get those results. Like we see a lot of the time people going out on one channel like Instagram and thinking, ‘Oh yeah, this is going to drive so many sales for my online product.’ But the truth is that Instagram sucks as a sales channel. So, getting very clear on one or two channels, getting really clear on what you’re doing there, what you’re trying to do, is probably the biggest way that you can make it an impact for you.

Dee:

Something you and I are really big fans of is looking at the figures. You have to start looking at those insights. And knowing what numbers to be looking at because otherwise you’re kind of just pissing in the wind. And know how, how else do you know what’s sticking and what’s working and what’s getting to people. Right?

Jane:

Absolutely. Looking at the insights as kind of a next step after you launch your channel, looking at what posts are performing well, what’s actually driving growth of the channel, what’s driving clicks back to your website. That’s going to be very, very telling and important to keeping you on track.

Dee:

And you’ve got a really handy chart that I absolutely love and I use it as my kind of social media Bible, which I would love to go through in a minute. But first of all, I just wanted to have a chat with you about getting a social media manager or contributor on board. I feel like it’s kind of a little bit of a chicken and the egg thing. Do you hire someone first of all to  manage your social media for you if it’s not your area of expertise or if it’s taking you too long and taking you away from your area of genius? And if you do hire someone, do you do it right off the bat? Or do you wait til you start having an income into your business, knowing that hiring someone could actually lead to those sales? So what would you advise to someone who’s feeling like that? At what point should I consider hiring someone to start helping me with my social media?

Jane:

That’s a really great important question, especially since it’s not uncommon to have someone come in and quote like $3,000 a month on some of these channels. With prices like that, it’s really important to understand what are your goals, where are you in your business and what is your social likely to achieve for you? 

What do you want to achieve for your organization if you’re a brand new startup? If this is being able to make sure that you have cash in the bank for the slow trickle of clients that will come in, then hiring a social media manager at that price point could potentially put you out of business and is unlikely to actually get you the sales that you need in the first six months. 

I do want to note that ‘cause Digital Marketing, we do full service social media, but it’s actually very rare that we will offer to do so for small because more often than not, small businesses and startups are set up better to be able to manage some of that on their own. And we actually have a product caller called our Small Business Boosters where we just take the hardest thing off of the businesses plate for a specific channel. 

So for example, on Instagram there’s a content strategy and then there’s like actually getting the eyeballs that you need. The actually getting the eyeballs is really work intensive and you really have to understand the platform, versus the content is fairly easy because it’s a picture and a couple sentences about what’s going on in your company. 

So what we do for our booster is we provide the audience growth and then suggestions and guidance on what content you should post, but then the business actually does the posting themselves and that in itself allows us to bring that price point from like $3,000 a month to $299 a month.

Dee:

Which is spectacular considering I know how much effort you put into that and how and the impact that it has.

Jane:

I’ve not seen any other digital marketing firms that do this. The reason why we created these Small Business Boosters is because I’m co-owner in workingwithdog.com which works specifically with solopreneurs. And I just kept kind of seeing this challenge of small business owners going out trying to do it all. And it’s stuff that we can take off their plate very easily. And then what we’ve found is when we do that, they actually excel and exceed and then they don’t have the fear of that high price tag or the commitment to that high price tag that really is unaffordable for them at that point.

Dee

And just to have someone who understands all the algorithms that keep on changing on Facebook, and hashtags, if you haven’t sort of grown up with hashtags. I’m thinking of me. They can be super confused and unless you’re doing them well, there’s almost little point in doing them at all.

Jane:

Ah, yeah. So hashtags, that depends on what channel that you’re talking about. Hashtags can actually be quite helpful on LinkedIn. But understanding which hashtags work best for you, which hashtags to use. That’s the kind of guidance that we provide. And that is not always easily apparent to someone who maybe their area of genius is going out and creating amazing community events or maybe their area of genus geniuses running a dog walking business. These are things that you need to be an expert at social media to be able to do and do well. So we just back up companies and backup change makers so that they can focus on kind of the change that they’re meant to make in the world. And, I know that I’ve found that personally very empowering to be able to work with businesses that way and the team loves it.

Dee:

And I’ve worked with some other entrepreneurs that have used your boosters and worked with you and they have just been super impressed. It’s really helped them take their business to the next level. I can definitely vouch for your awesome. So let’s have a look at your chart that you are notorious for nowadays. 

Jane:

I’ll note that I have a toolkit that I created for small businesses. It’s a little more comprehensive than just the six square. It leads you through some of the strategic questions that I was talking about and then actually helps you start to think about what’s that output output on each social channel going to be. 

Here is the link, this is my gift to you. 

I want to see you succeed in this and that’s going to be super, super helpful. I created this toolkit because I get this question all the time and it’s not necessarily cost or time effective for you to go out and, and have to go through all this on your own. So here, this is our gift.

Go download it right now and then follow along. 

In the handout you’ll see that there are some strategic deep thinking questions that we ask and I definitely want you to go through those, but I’ll talk through the six square. The way that we designed this toolkit is it’s literally going around and circling things in the six square to decide which social channel you should start with. So,print it out, pause this, come back and then do this exercise with us.

Jane:

Once you have your business goals aligned, you need to ask yourself five core questions as as far as which social media channels should you start with. Those five core questions are;

Who am I trying to reach? 

How do I want to reach them? 

What am I trying to do? 

What’s most important to me? 

And then I need a social media channel that makes blank easy. 

And what I’ve done is gone through the six big social channels and answered what each of these makes easy. 

So for example, for Facebook, who does Facebook reach? Here we have some stats on it shows that Facebook skews really female, meaning that the largest group of users on the platform are female. Its largest age demographic is 25 to 34 year olds, but with over a billion daily active users and a whopping 79% of internet users across the world who are logging into this platform. This is where you go to reach everyone. Anyone and everyone, basically everyone has a Facebook at this point. 

One caveat there is that younger users have really started abandoning this platform and moving more toward Instagram. And one of the biggest ways that we suggest using Facebook right now is social proof and social validation.

If you’re not paying to reach people on Facebook, really they’re not gonna come and find you or see you unless they already know about you and already are thinking about whether to hire you or buy from you. 

But if they come and they see a Facebook page that’s essentially deserted or they don’t see any Facebook page at all, that puts a big question mark in their minds. 

Dee:

I feel like this has replaced websites in that sense. There used to be a time where you would be a little bit reluctant to hire anyone if they didn’t have a website. And now it’s the same with Facebook. If someone’s not on Facebook, do they even exist?

Jane:

Exactly. Really making sure that your Facebook page offers some value for these people who are coming over and considering your services or your products. Making sure that it looks alive, making sure that there’s good reviews there if you can. And, otherwise, unless you’re doing paid advertising, probably not investing too much more time and Facebook because this can be a real time suck for brands. As I explained, you’re not going out and reaching new people so much with this unless you’re doing ads. 

That brings us to the second question. How do I want to reach people? We outlined that Facebook is mostly paid these days. Facebook is great at driving integrated campaigns that are coordinated with email or that are reaching people who have specific interests.

This really comes into play in a beautiful way when you’re using Facebook advertising. If you’re not using Facebook advertising, it’s less likely that your posts are going to be seen. If you’re not doing it into integrated campaign, just as I said, make the page look alive, look compelling, look valid to anyone who’s considering your services.

Being certain that you’re reaching the right people in the most cost effective way is really easy on Facebook because you can target down to such detail. I can go in and I can say I want people from this zip code who have bought dog food in the last X amount of time, who make over a hundred thousand a year.

I’m able to target to that level of detail. That’s not really an option for the other social channels. 

It also make it very easy to share other people’s content if you are a nonprofit or if you are asking for donations, it has a beautifully robust donation platform and certainly email us at ‘cause Digital Marketing. If you’re interested in our one-on-one on how to set up donations for your nonprofit through Facebook. Those are all really easy on Facebook. And I’d say that there’s no other social channel that’s quite as robust that way other than LinkedIn. So if you’re looking for those functionalities, I would really consider perhaps putting a few dollars into advertising and making Facebook work for you. But if those aren’t as important, then there are certainly other social channels that you can still get the organic kind of juice going that you can’t do on Facebook anymore. 

Dee:

So, LinkedIn for example. I know that that’s something I need to be more active on. I just go on there and just don’t even really know how, so you might be hearing from me soon about your Boosters! 

Jane:

I will shout out because LinkedIn is probably my favorite social channel right now. If you are doing B2C, so if your business is completely consumer facing, LinkedIn’s a lot less important to you. But if you have any B2B component, if you are selling to other businesses, partnering with other businesses, looking to create co-campaigns with other businesses, LinkedIn is the place to be. There is no other social channel that really allows the kind of organic growth that LinkedIn does right now. 

It is just such a rich place. We get so many referrals and so much of our own business through LinkedIn. LinkedIn is really the social media channel for professionals, roughly about one in 10 of LinkedIn’s 500 million monthly users are high level executives and decision makers in their business. So you’re not just reaching the admin or the assistant, which is great, but not always who you want to talk to. You’re actually reaching the decision makers in these businesses.

You’re reaching the business owners and it is a very simple platform for you to go out and actually develop and start meaningful conversations with these guys. While one in 10 or 500 million is certainly a lot lower than what Facebook’s numbers are, it is the best place. And gives you the best chance of reaching those professional decision makers of any other social channel out there right now. 

While it does have a paid component, you can run ads on the platform, I’m gonna make a lot of you smile right now by saying that it is not worth it as a moment. It is actually way more cost effective to go in organically and to really boost organically through a content marketing strategy than trying to put paid anything into their ads platform. It’s just very costly. We’ve run a bunch of tests on it. 

Dee:

So the money you’d save on the ads you could put towards a company like yours to get a really good strategy in place.

Jane:

Absolutely. And like a Small Business Booster for LinkedIn is$299 a month. That’s $10 a day.

Dee:

Do you recommend the people getting the premium version of LinkedIn? It’s something I’m always on the fence about. I unsubscribed and then I resubscribed.

Jane:

LinkedIn premium is a beautiful platform. I will say that it gives you access to more people and gives you access to reach out to more people cold without having huge networks in your in your pocket right away. That said, it’s not cheap. If you personally aren’t going to be that active on it, we don’t always recommend it.

Dee:

It’s a relief to know that at least you don’t need to start out with it. So you can see in time whether you think you’ll benefit from it rather than having to buy all of the things right away.

Jane:

Absolutely. If you’re just starting on LinkedIn, I wouldn’t dive in with premium right away. 

Dee:

And so Twitter, can we talk about Twitter? Twitter is one that’s just always personally and professionally, confused me because it just seems to go so fast. I feel like, if I had a Twitter account for my business, I would have to post a hundred times a day for anyone to see it because you blink and it’s gone. 

Jane:

You summed it up perfectly. With Twitter, if you are trying to reach media professionals or if you are trying to be like say active in the US political sphere (unfortunately we have some politicians who love Twitter). Unless you’re trying to do those two things, Twitter’s probably not for you. As simple as that. 

Twitter’s main user base is 18 to 29 year olds. That’s their largest demographic and the gender differential is split pretty evenly. It is very unlikely that you as a small business will ever actually see the investment in Twitter returned in your business and you described why perfectly. 

Twitter doesn’t really have the ability to target on an interest basis other than hashtags. And because it’s moving so fast with all these different hashtags, unless you’re going to invest significant amount of time, unless you’re essentially going to hire someone to manage this for you full time, you’re not really going to get any traction. And the truth is that most businesses will never see the return on investment. So it’s something that we very, very rarely use and very, very rarely recommend.

Dee:

At least we can eliminate one, that makes it less confusing. One that I hear is getting bigger in terms of directing traffic to sort of business websites is Pinterest.

Jane:

Pinterest is a really fun one. Pinterest is a couple things. One, women dominate the platform. It is significantly skewed towards suburban households with higher income and more education. Age 18 to 29 year olds are the biggest age demographic currently on the platform, but 30 to 49 is a pretty close second. So really women age 18 to 49 are readily available on this platform. 

It launched a number of years ago. And what a lot of brands did was they jumped in early, often they jumped in a big way, and then they didn’t see immediate results. So they petered off. 

And what’s been funny is that Pinterest, unlike all the other social platforms, acts a lot more like a search engine than it does a social media platform. And by that I mean content that doesn’t age out, which is really important.

You know, Twitter content ages out in a minute, on Facebook content ages out in a day or maybe max a week. Pinterest content will be resurfaced and reshown for years. And if you are interested in something and it is getting read and pinned by other people, then you’re more likely to see it even years, years and years later. So what has surprised a lot of businesses is that that initial investment that they put in a few years ago, now they’re opening their Google analytics, which is like my happy place. And they’re looking at traffic, they’re looking at their referral traffic from social media. And number one is usually Facebook as far as how people get from social media channels to your website. But a pretty close second is Pinterest even without them using Pinterest. 

A lot of brands have turned around and decided to re-examine Pinterest. And we actually have one client who gets significant number of sales off of Pinterest every single month, just by posting like one piece of content a month, which is not best practice by the way. That’s not what we recommend. And that’s not what we do for our booster. But, it is an example of how powerful that platform can be.

Something to also to kind of keep in mind and compare to the other super visual platform, which is an Instagram. On Instagram you can’t link your posts unless you’re either paying or you reach a certain follower threshold, which I think is 10,000 right now. But on Pinterest, every single post you do can link back to your website. So that helps you. That also really prompts buying behaviour. If someone sees something that they like, they can click and go buy on your website right then and there. So that’s where so much of the power of Pinterest comes in.  

Dee:

And it’s not just products that you could have on Pinterest as pins. It’s any blog posts you do, any podcast episodes, each one could be a series of pins on Pinterest that you can make, that people would then share, hopefully and find and then come back to your website through. 

Jane:

Absolutely. So some of the most popular, content on Pinterest is like how-tos. So if you’re giving, top 10 tips for how to do this in your blog and you just want to create a little bit of a nice photo, a tall, long photo, unlike any other social channel for Pinterest, and link that back to your blog, it’s a great way to drive traffic. 

Dee:

So the other visual social media channel that you mentioned, Instagram, why don’t you tell us about that? Who’s on Instagram? 

Jane:

Young folks. So all the people who are leaving Facebook are generally moving toward Instagram and it’s become so popular that it’s actually the second most popular social network.

It does skew a little bit more toward kind of female users than male users. 38% of female internet users and only 26% of male internet users are on the platform. The main age demographic is 18 to 29 year olds, but that has been kind of increasing in some of the older age demographics. Its users are usually more likely to be urban and have college experience. So if that describes your audience, if you have a young audience, a young customer who is urban and has college experience, maybe a young professional, Instagram could be a great platform for you. The caveat I will put there is that if you are trying to drive sales through Instagram, whether it’s a service or a product, it’s really hard on Instagram.

Dee:

So Instagram would be more for brand awareness. Is that it? 

Jane:

Yeah, exactly. Instagram is the place where people can find you and fall in love with you. But then to actually get them to act, if you want them to take any kind of action toward buying your stuff, usually you need to drive them towards your email list and that’s where they’ll buy. 

Dee:

So YouTube, maybe I’m guilty of this and no one else is, but I always forget about this as a social media channel. Maybe I’m the only one. 

Jane:

No, you’re not the only one. The irony of YouTube is that it is the second largest search engine. So there’s Google, Google owns YouTube, but there are millions of users every single day going into YouTube looking for stuff. And this is the one other social channel other than Pinterest where the age of your content doesn’t matter so much.

So if you’re focusing on just creating like one great video a month, it could play pretty well on YouTube. It’s not like you have to go out there and do selfie videos every single day. 

The thing to keep in mind with YouTube is that it is very skewed towards men. Age 25 to 34 year old men are the largest YouTube demographic and they tend to spend far more time on the platform, upwards of like 45% more time on the platform than women each month. But most of that actually comes down to guys watching gaming videos on. So when you take out that big chunk, and for example look at the pet and animal videos, the gap closes a lot. 

YouTube is also increasingly popular with older demographics and a big reason why is YouTube is just a great platform for teaching people. If someone doesn’t know how to do something, they will Google it and then the search results will actually bring them to a YouTube video that shows them how. So if you have a brand where you’re teaching people how to do something or giving some kind of demo, then YouTube can be so, so powerful for driving value. 

Dee:

So I am one thing I am absolutely a massive fan of is not reinventing the wheel and making a bit of content and hopefully being able to put it on different platforms. Is that something that you also like? Please say yes and tell me I’m not doing it all wrong. Like for example, you could make a video and put it on YouTube and get it transcribed and use quotes to make really pretty graphics for Instagram and then link to it on Pinterest.

Jane:

Yes. I teach all my junior staffers ‘create once, publish everywhere.’ Alot of people feel like, ‘if I develop this great piece of content on my blog and I share it via Facebook, that’s enough.’ And as we already talked about, Facebook is actually not being seen a lot of the time.

If you’re taking the time to develop a great piece of content and you’re not using that to distribute and get people aware about it on every single channel you’re on, then you’re throwing money away. You really should consider doing exactly what you were talking about, create the YouTube video, have it transcribed, turn that into a blog have the video embedded within the blog so that that gets views as well. Then, take a few like pull quotes of that for Instagram to create some pretty graphics. Upload a snippet of the YouTube video to Facebook. Don’t just share a link from YouTube to Facebook because they’re competitors and Facebook buries YouTube links. Put like five seconds of that video and say, ‘Hey, go watch the rest on our blog’ because then Facebook doesn’t think you’re linking to YouTube, and then share that, via Pinterest with a nice pretty image. And then on LinkedIn, talk about how awesome the process of being a professional who just went through this is and share that link as well, was such a handy tip. 

So that’s five, six bits of content just from one action, one activity. And then I’d actually say get in there and schedule resharing at least monthly for the next three months and make sure that each year, if you’re creating new content, you’re going back and looking at what would still be relevant? What can I reshare again? 

There’s a funny story and I can’t remember which editorial outlet this was from, but it was for a big women’s magazine and I saw the editor in chief speak and she was talking about their Pinterest strategy. She said the thing that went crazy on Pinterest was this super complex, crazy cookie recipe. It’s like a layered cookie recipe with like 10 different layers and exact in-cuts and everything. But that the magazine would basically take the one piece of content, which is this recipe and the photos for this recipe, and then recreate the social media posts every single year. And every single year it would go viral and they just knew that that was gold. Don’t feel like you’re boring people or oversharing on social. 

And again, look at the stats. Which posts from your past have done really well? Is that one that you want to consider resharing or has something happened that has made it relevant all over again, or was it always relevant? 

One thing with social to keep in mind is thinking about what are people talking about right now. One of the ways that you can get the most exposure on social is by talking about something that’s timely, talking about something that’s happening and top of mind for your audience right now. 

That can be really hard to do. That can be really time consuming, which is why we created those Boosters. Because for a lot of channels we just take that off your plate and we do that. But if you’re able to go in and talk about something that’s timely or even anticipate that something’s going to be timely soon and create something worthwhile, that’s when you really see things go viral. 

So I’ll give you an example of that. I’ve been writing in the pet health space for over a decade. I know that in the pet health space, anytime there is a human health threat, anytime there’s big news about some kind of disease or issue with human health, before long someone will ask, ‘can my dog get it?’ 

Remember Ebola, when everyone was worried about Ebola going everywhere all over the globe. My team and I, we saw that and I was like, you know what, someone’s going to ask can dogs get it. So we went out to veterinarians, we created a story and we actually held on to it until we saw people starting to ask. And in that way we were able to scoop CNN.

Dee:

That’s amazing insight there. So let me ask you, I’m going to put out some hypothetical people, and why don’t you tell me what you would suggest for them? A couple of tips for them in terms of what they should do on social media. How do you feel about this little game?

Jane:

I love it.

Dee:

Okay, cool. So how about someone hypothetically, who’s exactly like me, who sells online courses, one-to-one consulting, and maybe some live events. What would be the top platforms you would recommend for them? And what kind of things do you think they should be putting on them?

Jane:

LinkedIn for sure. If you’re not on LinkedIn, then you’re missing the boat and you and I need to talk about LinkedIn for you because LinkedIn is, if you’re selling business courses, if you’re selling any kind of course, then developing thought leadership and developing your network on LinkedIn is going to be the biggest bang for your buck. 

I would really consider Instagram or YouTube for this hypothetical person. Instagram can be tough. YouTube can be tough. Those certainly have kind of higher barriers to entry and harder to get ROI. I would encourage this person to look through the six square, do the circling of their goals and their channels and see which one of those others come up. 

But LinkedIn, really juicing up their personal profile too. We haven’t talked much about the difference between a personal or corporate profile on it, but where you see all the goodness is in the personal profile these days. 

Dee:

What about someone who’s got a more of a service, a local service provider. Say a dog walker?

Jane:

I love Instagram for local service providers. And the reason is that it’s actually easy for you to go in and start to connect and have genuine conversations with people in your local area. And some of the ways that you can do that are by using local hashtags, certainly, but then also looking at other local businesses and who follows them and then going and liking those posts. So those people saying, ‘Oh my God, that’s the cutest fluffernutter dog I’ve ever seen.’ Having those conversations, um, can be really a great way to impress and also establish yourself as a doggie expert or local expert on Instagram and local personality.

Dee:

If you’re in the pet industry, then Instagram seems like an obvious choice because if you’re working with animals, you’ve got an endless supply of cute little things to take pictures of. You won’t struggle for content there, will you? 

Jane: 

Yeah, you’ll do pretty well. Instagram can be a little bit tough, as I mentioned, to get the ROI though. If you’re trying to go out and raise awareness of your business, then Instagram is a fantastic platform. If you are trying to go out and get sales tomorrow, Instagram’s not going to be it.

Dee:

Gotcha. So what about someone who’s got a local store, they’re not online or anything? What would you recommend for them?

Jane:

So I really want to talk to that person about their goals. What are they trying to achieve? Are they trying to provide a safe space for people who are considering them but maybe a little afraid to walk in their doors? Are people checking them out online but not necessarily finding what will bring them in the doors? Are they potentially open to the idea of hosting local events in their stores to get more people in? If so, Facebook might actually be a great platform for them. 

I work with and speak with a lot of independent retailers and they still say by hosting local events on Facebook by maybe creating a local group on Facebook that’s not even business-related, but maybe about the history of your town. Facebook still packs a lot of fun there, especially if you have a little bit of money for an ad spend to make sure that it gets seen.

Dee:

That’s amazing. Thank you so much Jane. I mean, it’s just fascinating. I really feel like I’ve got a better handle of what should happen on each platform and definitely much more open to the idea of getting someone on board to help out. Because it sounds like you could very easily just get bogged down into all of them. And probably waste a lot of money on different ads if you don’t know what you’re doing with them. 

Jane:

I can’t recommend the toolkit enough for getting really clear on what does your business need to achieve now and in the next six months. And then how can your social media channel of choice help you do that? 

Dee:

Thank you again for joining us.
In the meantime come join us on our Facebook page.